Connect with us

Latest News

SC to Centre on Ukraine-returned medical students

Published

on


New Delhi: The Supreme Court suggested on Friday that the Center could develop a web portal providing details of foreign universities for medical students who returned from Ukraine after Russia’s invasion in February to complete their studies.

A bench made up of Justices Hemant Gupta and Sudhanshu Dhulia told Solicitor General Tushar Mehta, representing the Centre, that the government should help Indian students who will now have to go abroad under alternative schemes and that the High Commissions could help. to the students.

“Start a web portal, post details like available places in colleges (alternative foreign universities, which are compatible), fees, make sure agents don’t rip them off,” the bank said, adding that the government should use its resources to help. to those affected. students.

Mehta said that he is not taking a contradictory position and sought time to obtain instructions from the relevant authorities regarding the suggestions made by the high court.

He further stated that the Center has taken various measures to help students, even those who were unable to do their clinical training have been allowed to complete it here and have been guaranteed to get their degrees in Ukraine, and the rest is a “training program”. academic mobility.

The bank pointed out that the government has a problem admitting 20,000 students to Indian universities, adding that students will have to go to foreign countries to take advantage of the alternative “academic mobility programme”, and that the Center must coordinate and extend the entire help required.

The Center has told the Supreme Court that medical students cannot be accommodated in Indian universities in the absence of a provision under the National Medical Commission (NMC) Act, 2019, and if such relaxation is granted, standards of medical care will be seriously hampered. education in the country.

In an affidavit, the Union Ministry of Health and Family Welfare said: “Prayer seeking the transfer of these returned students to medical colleges in India would not only comply with the provisions of the Medical Council Act of India, 1956 and the National Medical Commission Act, 2019, as well as the regulations issued under it, but would also seriously hamper the standards of medical education in the country.”

During Friday’s hearing, a lawyer suggested that the Center should declare 20,000 students who returned from Ukraine as “victims of war” under the Geneva Convention and extend relief to them.

The court orally noted that the lawyer should not take him to that level as the students had gone there voluntarily.

Mehta said that NMC allowed academic mobility in foreign universities, so those students can complete their courses from other foreign universities and also informed the court that an officer has been appointed to coordinate with the students to find which of the varieties are compatible. .

The high court said that one officer cannot handle 20,000 students and the government can develop the web portal for students to access information.

Lead lawyer Salman Khurshid pointed to problems related to language and fees: a student who studied at a Ukrainian university might find it difficult to adjust to a Polish university, and problems related to fees could also arise.

The bench said: “All the details will be given on the portal. Do you want it all. If they want to complete their course, they have to find a way out.”

Lead attorney R. Basant, representing some petitioners, said that if foreign universities can accommodate students, then Indian universities can do the same.

The bank then said, “You have no claim on Indian universities.”

The high court has scheduled a new hearing on the matter for September 23.

The high court was hearing a batch of petitions filed by students, who had to return from war-torn Ukraine, seeking permission to complete their medical education in India.

(IANS)


Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Latest News

R.I.P. true friend of India Dominique Lapierre, you will be missed

Published

on


New Delhi: French author Dominique Lapierre (91), who had a special bond with India and was known for his iconic book on Kolkata, ‘City of Joy’, has died due to age-related ailments.

Lapierre’s wife, Dominique Conchon-Lapierre, confirmed the news to the French newspaper Var-matin on Monday.

Lapierre received the country’s third highest civilian honor, the Padma Bhushan, was fluent in Bengali and wrote the iconic “City of Joy,” the inspiring story of an American doctor who experienced a spiritual renaissance in an impoverished section of Calcutta, plus of collaborating with American writer Larry Collins on such seminal works as “Freedom At Midnight” and “Is Paris Burning.”

Adapted for film by Roland Joffe and starring Patrick Swayze, “City of Joy” is about the unsung heroes of Kolkata’s Pilkhana slum. Lapierre donated half of the royalties he earned from this book to support various humanitarian projects in Kolkata, including shelters for children with leprosy and polio, clinics, schools, rehabilitation workshops, educational programmes, health actions and hospital ships.

Calcutta, now Kolkata, has been nicknamed ‘City of Joy’ after the novel.

To process and channel the charity funds, Lapierre founded an association called Action Aid for Calcutta Lepers’ Children (registered in France under the official name Action pour les enfants des l preux de Calcutta). Aware of the corruption in India, he arranged all of his fund transfers to India in such a way as to ensure that the money reached the right person for the right purpose. His wife since 1980, Dominique Conchon-Lapierre was his partner in the City of Joy Foundation.

His other Indian classic (with Larry Collins), “Freedom At Midnight,” is a detailed account of the final year of the British Raj, the princely states’ reactions to independence, including descriptions of the extravagant lifestyles of Indian princes. , the partition of the subcontinent and the bloodshed that followed.

The events leading up to the assassination of Mahatma Gandhi and the lives of the motives of Jawaharlal Nehru and Muhammad Ali Jinnah are also described in detail.

There is a third book on India, “Five Past Midnight in Bhopal: The Epic Story of the World’s Deadliest Industrial Disaster” which Lapierre wrote in collaboration with Javier Moro based on the 1984 Bhopal disaster which the authors investigated by living in the city for three years.

Royalties from the book go to the Sambhava clinic in Bhopal, which provides free medical treatment to victims of the disaster. Lapierre also financed a primary school in Oriya Basti, one of the settlements described in the book.

Born on July 30, 1931, in Chatelaillon, Charte-Maritime in France, Lapierre was 18 years old when he received a Fulbright scholarship to study economics at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania. A car fanatic from the start, he bought a 1937 Chrysler convertible and fell in love with a fashion editor.

They were married in New York City Hall on her 21st birthday and flew to Mexico in the old Chrysler for their honeymoon. With just $300 in their pockets, they had enough to buy gas, sandwiches, and cheap motel rooms for truckers. In Los Angeles, they won another $300 on a radio game show for Campbell Soup. The prize included a box of soup, which was her only food for three weeks.

Lapierre sold the Chrysler for $400 in San Francisco and bought two tickets on the SS President Cleveland to Japan. The honeymoon lasted a year. They made their way through Japan, Hong Kong, Thailand, India, Iran, Turkey, and Lebanon. When they returned to France, Lapierre wrote his second book, “Honeymoon around the Earth.”

On his return to Paris after his honeymoon, he was conscripted into the French army. After a year in a tank regiment, he was transferred to SHAPE (Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe) headquarters to serve as an interpreter. One day in the cafeteria he met a young American corporal, Larry Collins, a Yale graduate and recruit and they became instant friends.

When Collins was discharged, he was offered a job at Procter & Gamble. Two days before he reported for the new job, United Press offered him a job as a subheading editor in their Paris office, for much less money than Procter & Gamble offered. Collins accepted the United Press offer, and Newsweek soon tapped him to be its Middle East correspondent.

When Lapierre was discharged, he found a job as a reporter for Paris Match magazine. Collins became godfather to the Lapierres’ first daughter, Alexandra. On several occasions, Collins and Lapierre met while on assignment. Despite their friendship, they had to compete with each other for stories. But they decided to join forces to tell a great story that would appeal to both French and Anglophone audiences.

His first best-seller “Is Paris Burning?” it sold close to 10 million copies in 30 languages ​​by mixing the modern technique of investigative journalism with the classical methods of historical investigation. It was also made into a movie.

After that, they spent four years in Jerusalem to reconstruct the birth of Israel for the book “Oh Jerusalem!” Lapierre was proud that, after spending so much time in Jerusalem, he was intimately familiar with every alley, square, street, and building in the Holy City.

Lapierre and Collins wrote several other books together, notably “The Fifth Horseman”, the last being “Is New York Burning” before Collins’ death in 2005.

RIP true friend from India Dominique Lapierre. You will be greatly missed.

(IANOS)


Continue Reading

Latest News

33 persons killed in Colombia landslide

Published

on


Bogota: At least 33 people died from a landslide that buried vehicles along a highway in Colombia, Interior Minister Alfonso Prada said.

The landslide that occurred on Sunday buried a bus carrying passengers from Cali to Condoto, along with a car and a motorcycle on the Pereira-Quibdó highway, in the central-western department of Risaralda, the Xinhua news agency reports.

“We have identified 33 deceased people, including three minors. We have rescued nine people, four of them are currently in critical condition,” Prada said Monday.

Personnel from Colombia’s Risk Management Unit and the Transportation Ministry’s Transit and Transport Directorate, as well as the police department and the army, rushed to the rescue, he said.

Following the landslide, authorities plan to declare a nationwide high alert to prepare for weather-related disasters amid a cold snap that is expected to continue for several more months, Prada said.

President Gustavo Petro ordered the installation of a Unified National Command Post in the capital Bogotá by Tuesday at the latest to determine the state of the roads in adverse weather conditions, he said.

Risaralda Governor Víctor Manuel Tamayo told reporters that the road where the accident occurred is in poor condition, complicating efforts to find survivors and recover the bodies of the victims.

(IANOS)


Continue Reading

Latest News

At 6, Indian-origin boy is youngest S’porean to trek to Everest Base Camp

Published

on


Singapore: A six-year-old boy of Indian origin has become the youngest Singaporean to reach Everest Base Camp in Nepal at an altitude of 5,364 metres.

Om Madan Garg walked for 10 days in October together with his parents, covering an elevation gain of around 2,500m from Lukla village at 2,860m to the base at 5,364m, according to the Singapore Book of Records.

Om, a Kindergarten 2 student at Canossaville Preschool, “managed well despite bad weather, flight cancellations, lack of amenities, hot days and cold nights.”

The Garg family reached Lukla, which is the starting point and also the gateway of the base camp trek on September 28, and arrived at the base on October 7.

They were accompanied by a licensed guide and two porters.

From Lukla, they walked to Phakding and continued until they reached Namche Bazaar, the commercial center of the Everest region.

From Namche Bazaar the trail goes to Tengboche and eventually to Everest Base Camp at 5364m.

“I threw my hat into the sky and caught it and we climbed to the top of the rock at Mount Everest Base Camp and took a photo. “We flew the Singapore flag,” he told Channel News Asia in an interview.

The preschool student received a certificate from the Singapore Book of Records.

Their entire stay has been documented in a seven-part series on the family’s YouTube channel, The Brave Tourist.

Three-year-old Heyansh Kumar from India is the youngest person to reach Mount Everest Base Camp.

Kumar was three years, seven months and 27 days old when he achieved the milestone.

(IANOS)


Continue Reading

Trending